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Make Mine Well Done

Next time you chow down on that juicy burger grilled on your trusty barby or when ordering your fave from a local drive-thru, better make sure that burger is well-done -- really well done.

For decades, Health Canada advised consumers to cook ground beef to 71 °C (159.8 °F). That was suppose to be the tipping point for harmful bacteria, like E coli, to be thermally destroyed making the ground beef safe to eat. But food scientists at the University of Alberta recently discovered the recommended temperature may not be high enough.

Food Borne Illness

Food Safety Magazine recently published an interesting study on food recalls. The publication tallied recalls from 2015 data from three different agencies—the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA FSIS), and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The results produced some interesting and disturbing insights.

According to the report, the good citizens of Canada and the US experienced 629 food recalls in 2015. One third of the total recalls was due to common, repeat allergens - wheat, eggs, peanuts and dairy. Other allergens included soy, sulfites and various types of tree nuts—almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews and pistachios. Milk was one of the most undeclared food allergens.

Say NO to GMO Salmon

The line between genetically engineered fodder and natural food is once again being blurred thanks to the Canadian government. Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency rammed through approval of genetically modified salmon without public consultation or assessment of the potential effects of GM fish escaping into the wild. And, once the transgenic fish are in our grocery stores, no labelling will be required. Why? Advocates of GMO fodder know consumers won’t buy it.

Tackling Food Waste

Food is the single largest contributor to U.S. landfills today. In Canada, the stats are no different. An estimated $27 billion in Canadian food annually finds its way to landfill and composting, creating unnecessarily high levels of carbon and methane. That's approximately 40% of all the food we produce.

NMX - New Organic Pesticide Shows Promise

A new organic pesticide developed at New Mexico State University is showing great promise. Called NMX, the essential oil-based pesticide is a safe alternative to conventional chemical pesticides and solutions. NMSU Microbiologist Geoffrey Smith developed NMX with a team of three researchers, who discovered that a mixture of essential oils from common desert plants can help defend against fungus, bacteria, nematodes and some insects, such as thrips.

Europe Bans Two Endocrine-Disrupting Weedkillers

The European Commission has ordered a ground-breaking moratorium on two endocrine-disrupting weedkillers that have been linked to thyroid cancer, infertility, reproductive problems and foetal malformations.

The Dirtiest Fruit in Your Supermarket

After five years of topping the list, apples have officially been dethroned as the most pesticide-loaded produce. The new fruit that tops the Environmental Working Group's list of the "Dirty Dozen" -- strawberries. One of Nature's most potent packages of health-defending antioxidants, this sad news is not only maddening, it demonstrates, once again, the danger posed to the public's health when food becomes a commodity.

Monstano's Playing the Shell Game - Again

The monolithic chemical company, Monsanto, is at it yet again. This time, they are trying to convince the world that glyphosate, their number one selling herbicide, is not a probable carcinogen as defined by World Health Organization report published earlier this year.

Christmas Trees - Real or Plastic?

For many, decorating the Christmas tree is our favourite part of the holiday season. There is nothing as magical. It makes the beautiful out of the ordinary standing as a symbol of shared values, peace and hope. It holds the remembrances of old treasures and the promise of new life and there is an undercurrent of a stillness which reminds us of the importance of being close to each other, close to the earth and close to those who have gone before.

Glyphosate Takes Another Hit


Early in 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the research arm of the World Health Organization (WHO), determined glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, was to be listed a “probable carcinogen” (Class 2A). The recommendation was based on evidence showing the popular weed killer was linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma and lung cancer in humans,as well as convincing evidence that the pesticide can also cause cancer in animals.