• warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home1/jimijamz/public_html/organicprinciple.com/sites/all/modules/img_assist/img_assist.module on line 1643.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter_term_node_tid_depth::operator_options() should be compatible with views_handler_filter_in_operator::operator_options($which = 'title') in /home1/jimijamz/public_html/organicprinciple.com/sites/all/modules/views/modules/taxonomy/views_handler_filter_term_node_tid_depth.inc on line 89.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home1/jimijamz/public_html/organicprinciple.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 24.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home1/jimijamz/public_html/organicprinciple.com/sites/all/modules/img_assist/img_assist.module on line 1643.

Texas Scientists Find Antibiotic Resistance Blowing in Wind

Two Texas Tech University scientists may have made their biggest discovery yet: DNA from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in cattle feedlots is airborne.

The study focused on feedlots in Texas' Panhandle and South Plains, each holding tens of thousands of cattle, where animals spend the last few months of their lives gaining weight before slaughter. Feedlots were an ideal place to study antibiotic resistance because bacteria there are exposed to high levels of antibiotics.

Antibiotics are commonly used on cows in industrial feedlots to treat disease and, more controversially, as a growth promoter added to cattle feed. It is estimated that up to 80 percent of antibiotics sold in the United States are used on livestock.

"The 'aha' moment came when we saw how much more prevalent resistant sequences were downwind than upwind," said Mayer, a molecular biologist at Texas Tech. "It was not just higher in some of them – it was 4,000 percent more. It made me not want to breathe."

For years, scientists have known that humans can contract antibiotic-resistant bacteria by consuming contaminated meat or water. The findings by lead researchers Phil Smith and Greg Mayer indicate that humans could also be exposed to so-called "super bugs" or "super bacteria" traveling through the air.

One of their main concerns is that bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes will transfer antibiotic-resistant DNA to bacteria in the community where they settle, spreading resistance.

Related Links

Study:
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1408555/
What's In Your Meat
http://www.organicprinciple.com/whats_in_your_meat